Story Time: Pennsylvania Firefly Festival

Here we go: the first of the many recap posts I’ve promised.

Let’s do this thing.

So, this past weekend my friend Melissa and I went on a road trip to the Allegheny National Forest in Pennsylvania to attend this event called the Pennsylvania Firefly Festival.

Around this time every summer, a bunch of types of fireflies living in Allegheny go searching for ~love~, and it means that you get to see literally thousands of fireflies all sparkling and dancing out in the middle of the woods. It’s really nerdy (and really wonderful), so when Melissa asked me if I’d like to go with her, I jumped on the opportunity.

We left for the festival Saturday morning, drove all day (only making a quick stop at Dunkin’ Donuts for sustenance), and arrived at a campground in the afternoon. Unfortunately, it was not at all obvious what to do once arriving there, so we spent the next hour or so driving in circles and getting increasingly worried that we’d never find the actual campsites.

However, at least our view, during this portion of the day, was pretty pretty:


Eventually we did find a campsite, though, with the help of some very kind park rangers, and we spent another hour or so setting up our tent.

It was a three room, ten person tent. We are two very small people. I had never set up a tent before. I’m really proud of us.

Photo taken from the drawbridge over the moat surrounding our castle.

After wrangling that thing into standing, we headed for the festival itself. When we arrived, it appeared to be a pretty low key affair, which was disappointing at first. There were only a few food booths (and pretty much all the food was a variation on hotdogs) and there wasn’t much to see outside of that. (The music was all bluegrass–which neither of us were interested in–or stuff like Owl City’s “Firefly,” which is great and all, but is so on-the-nose I can only handle it for so long.) Bored with the sun still up (so no fireflies yet), Melissa and I decided to go for a walk along one of the trails branching off the property.

This was really nice and our first real taste of how gorgeous the Allegheny National Forest is.

Just, like, look at this:


Then the sun went down and a guide (who knew ALL about fireflies) took a big group of us out on a trail to watch synchronous fireflies come out to play and our earlier disappointment evaporated.

If you don’t know what the synchronous firefly is, it’s a type of firefly with a big, white glow that–if left in the quiet and dark for long enough–will synchronize its flashes with the rest of the synchronous fireflies in the area. So you get hundreds of fireflies all flashing in unison, out in the darkness.

I wish I had a picture or video to show you of this, because it was one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen. We sat out there for three hours, long after pretty much everyone else (including the guides) had headed home/back to their campsites. iPhone cameras just can’t capture that kind of magic though.

When we did walk back to the clearing where we’d parked, we were quiet and tired and ready to go flop down in our sleeping bags. But the moment we broke away from the treeline, we stopped and stared, eyes wide, tired lips quirked up in tired smiles–because there were more stars swirling away from us in the sky than I’ve possibly ever seen.

That entire night, it felt like we were living in a hyper-vivid dream–in that space between asleep and awake. It was all quiet, darkness punctured by pinpricks of light, fireflies that looked like shooting stars and stars that looked like resting fireflies.

I spent the drive back to the campsite with my forehead pressed to the car window, staring at the sky.

The next day, we packed up camp (again: SO PROUD OF US FOR WRANGLING THAT TENT) and headed out to a hiking area the lady at the visitor’s center suggested.

Of course, because we’re us, we got very lost and ended up trekking through a swamp for a while.


But then we eventually found the trail and it was GORGEOUS.

LOOK AT THIS COOL TREE GROWING OFF THE SIDE OF A HOUSE-SIZED BOULDER

We didn’t quite realize it while we were following the trail, but it led us to what appeared to be the top of a LITERAL MOUNTAIN (as in WE CLIMBED A MOUNTAIN) and it was SO BEAUTIFUL I CANNOT.


While we were trying to get a decent picture of the two of us at the overlook point, a group of guys hiking a different trail arrived, and while one took our picture we noticed that another was wearing a Michigan t-shirt. Our conversation basically went as follows:

Melissa: Oh, hey!

Me: Go blue!

Michigan Guy: What?

Melissa: We just graduated from there.

Michigan Guy: Really? Almost all of us are alums!

[We all proceed to swap war stories and talk classes]

Please note: we were out in the middle of Nowhere, Pennsylvania. We came across maybe ten people on our entire hike. And four of them were fellow Michigan graduates.

THIS ALWAYS HAPPENS. LIKE I KNOW IT’S AN UNDERSTATEMENT TO SAY WE HAVE A LOT OF ALUMNI. BUT STILL.

After talking with the guys for a bit, we headed back down the mountain.

And proceeded to get lost again.

I partially (mostly) blame this on the fact that there were no maps available ANYWHERE in the park (even the visitor’s center was out) and our phones didn’t have any signal, so we couldn’t even figure out where we were using Google Maps or anything.

The nice thing about doing stuff with Melissa, though, is that neither of us really mind getting lost, so it’s more fun than anything else. We ended up climbing through a bunch of cave-like rock formations and shimmying between trees and stuff, and it was great.

Luckily, however, we did eventually become un-lost and found the car again, where we proceeded to collapse and gulp water and generally be thankful for air conditioning. (Please note: it was over 90 degrees and sunny throughout this entire adventure.)

From there, we bid adieu to Pennsylvania and headed home. We made a stop at an Ohio Arby’s for food and much needed milkshakes (we hiked 6.5 miles, in the heat, up a mountain; we deserved it), and got sidelined by a downpour at one point, but soon enough we were back in Michigan–grateful for showers and beds, sure, but also missing the fireflies.

And that is the time we went to the Pennsylvania Firefly Festival.

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~Julia

 

Story Time: Going Home

Warning ahead of time: This is going to be a long and sappy one.

Yesterday was my first day of spring break and after a funky chain of events involving yet another dermatologist appointment and my mom needing to get back to work, I ended up with her minivan and the task of getting myself home in one piece.

Although I learned to drive a billion years ago, I didn’t get around to getting my license until the very end of 2014, and since then I haven’t been home enough to really use it. Until yesterday, I’d only driven by myself once before and that was entirely on surface streets that I knew like the back of my hand, making the trip to a friend’s house New Year’s Day in a compact, easy-to-maneuver Jeep.

So there I was, in Mom’s massive, headstrong minivan, driving for the first time in a month and for the first time by myself in two. On only my second solo trip.

Mom had rattled off a series of directions for getting home as we pulled up at her office, but I didn’t trust myself to remember anything (I was a little more focused on, you know, not killing anyone), so I opened Google Maps on my phone and told it to guide me home.

The first bit went all right. I turned where I was supposed to, merged onto the highway without too much trouble, and was even feeling so good about my prospects of surviving that I turned on the radio.

Then I realized which way home Google Maps was taking me.

There’s this terrible stretch of highway I’ve taken a thousand times as a passenger, but had never driven before, where a bridge breaks up the monotony of patched pavement. On one side of the bridge is an entrance ramp, always clogged with road rage-y drivers trying to force you out of their way, and on the other side is an exit ramp that sometimes gets so backed up, the line blocks the entrance ramp.

Here’s a problem with Google Maps: It told me what I needed to do. I even recognized what I was speeding towards. But it didn’t click until I was like twenty feet from the exit ramp, the entrance ramp people crowding me out of the far right lane and trying to force me even further to the left, that it really clicked that Google Maps was instructing me to take the exit that has made my mild-mannered mother mutter expletives on more than one occasion.

I can’t remember ever once going past that exit—I don’t even know where that highway leads past that exit—but as I tried to merge into the right lane, the car in that one pulled up beside me and tried to merge into mine. We were barreling towards the exit I needed and he clearly didn’t want. And somehow magically, magically, I managed to slow down without the pickup truck on my tail rear-ending me, giving the car to my right just enough time to pull ahead and into my lane while I swerved into his and straight down the exit ramp. A ballet of sorts.

Heart pounding, palms sweating, I made it down the exit ramp (which is actually an entrance ramp) and onto the connecting highway.

Slowly my heartbeat slowed. I recognized the backs of strip malls as I passed. And I stopped needing Google Maps because I was back in home territory, on streets I had driven before although never alone, and I made it home.

It was a beautiful day out, all clear blue sky and sparkling snow. Heat pulsed through the vents and I yanked off my hat and scarf. Unzipped my heavy down coat.

I pulled up outside my house and realized I didn’t want to go in.

So, after sending a quick text to my mom to let her know I was still alive, I pulled away from the curb and made my way to a nearby nature trail. I had to use a traffic circle and turn left into the parking lot—both things that terrified me just a couple months ago—but I made it fine. I sat in there in the warm minivan for a little while, letting “Ho Hey” by the Lumineers wash over me. Then I headed out on the trail.

The snow was about a thousand inches deeper than the last time I’d gone hiking there, a few days before Christmas with my family, and I wasn’t dressed for it, with only a light sweater on under my coat and heeled, knee-high faux leather boots. But I made it a decent way along the path, stopping to watch a churning river flow under shiny, clear ice and following deer tracks along a side path. After a while, I found what I was looking for: a pair of benches out in the sun, their snow melted so long ago they were dry.

I sat down on one, pulled the book I’d brought from my purse, and read.

hiking and reading 2-27-15

I don’t know if you’ve ever just sat out in the middle of nature without another creature in sight for an afternoon, but it’s one of my favorite ways to detox, especially on days like yesterday when it was cold but not too cold. (No bugs, no other people, but also no hypothermia.)

At one point an old man walked by and we exchanged hellos, but otherwise I didn’t see a single other person the entire time I sat there.

Growing restless after a while, I got up and hiked a couple more of the side paths, then came back to my bench and lay down with the sky so blue, blue, blue above me and the sun warm on my cheeks and birds calling to each other somewhere high in the branches, and read for a while longer.

At which point I realized I had no idea how much time had passed (it could have been two o’clock or five) and my phone was dead, so I pulled myself up and made the trek back to the minivan.

It wasn’t TOO late (only like three thirty), so I drove from there to Barnes and Noble to pick up a few more books, relishing in the fact that I’d managed to turn left out of the nature trail’s parking lot despite heavy traffic and I parked between two cars at B & N without straying outside my spot’s lines. (Also the fact that I drove past the pet store without stopping, despite my realization that I was an adult with a credit card, a car, and no one to stop me from going in there and adopting a hundred kittens.)

Perfect. The afternoon had been perfect.

Then I tried merging into the right lane to turn towards home and the car beside me wouldn’t let me over.

This was no complicated, lucky dance like had occurred on the highway. This was someone who clearly didn’t want to let me ahead of her, with another car right behind her.

This time, I missed my turn.

It wasn’t devastating or anything. It was only another mile to the next turn towards my house, so I’d barely lost any time or gas. But it was disappointing for an entire afternoon of doing well behind the wheel to end in this.

Except, wait—I saw a street sign coming up that I recognized and had forgotten about. My old street, the one my family lived on until I was around six, that also connected to where I needed to go. A shortcut.

I turned onto it.

I’ve been on my old street plenty of times since we moved. We still know people in the neighborhood and, as mentioned, it made a nice shortcut. But I’d never driven it before, not even with an ever watchful parent in the passenger seat, so it was strange to guide the minivan up the road, drawing closer and closer to the house where I’d learned to ride a bike and had countless playdates and first fallen in love with make believe and stories and symbolism.

The backyard’s full of fruit trees—cherry and a whole row of apple. There’s a maple tree that my brother and the neighbors and I climbed constantly and bled all over almost as constantly from scraped palms and knees. We had a sandbox shaped like a tugboat that my brother used to grow maple saplings from seeds and a play gym my dad built himself.

This was the house where my brother and I built forts in the living room with cardboard bricks and couch cushions to keep the monsters away while watching Scooby Doo. This was the house where I had “tea parties” with countless babysitters with my pink plastic tea set full of hot water from the bathroom sink, and made up complicated, endless stories about my collection of toy horses.

This was the house where I terrorized our cats by zipping them into suitcases and yanking them out from beneath furniture. This was the house where my brother once shattered the bathroom window by hitting it at just the right spot with a toothbrush while trying to kill a fly. This was the house where my parents left a TV on in my bedroom all night long for weeks on end in kindergarten because I was afraid of the dark and sleep and everything in between.

I have so many wonderful and terrible memories of that house, all so lodged in the past, buried under more recent things, more relevant ones, I hardly ever think about them anymore.

As I pulled near, I spotted movement up the driveway and I realized there were three little kids racing toward the garage with backpacks that were far too big for them bouncing, two boys and a teeny, tiny girl, dressed in head-to-toe pink.

It’s funny how life goes on. How one day you’re five years old, living in one house, and the next you’re twenty, just driving past it on your way to another. It’s funny how hard I cried when my parents made us move, how we panicked when we thought the movers had let my cat out and he was lost forever, but we found him and everything was okay and he made it all the way to my senior year of high school instead.

It’s funny how now I’m a junior in college, contemplating where to go, what to do after I graduate, and how those kids were still so many years away from existence the last time I was inside the house that is now theirs—and it’s funny how then, by chance; thanks to a jerk not letting me turn when I wanted to—there we were in the same place at the same time for a moment, a flash as I drove by and they hurried up the driveway, these kids who will never know who I am or what they have in common with me and probably didn’t even notice the minivan as it passed.

It’s funny how there I was, enjoying an afternoon of freedom on my first day of spring break—feeling it settle into my bones, this Being An Adult thing—and completely on accident, I drove past the house where my life took shape and didn’t see the place where I tore up my knees on the climbing tree or made up my very first stories in a cozy pink bedroom cluttered with toys, but three shiny new lives also just starting to take shape, another little girl in pink trying to keep up, life going on, on, on.

And it’s funny because symbolism. I’m in love with symbolism, and here was a whole bunch of it handed to me on a platter. A moment that would feel “too constructed,” not real, in fiction, but happened in real life.

I didn’t slow down or anything. Just kept driving. The kids disappeared behind trees and mailboxes.

But I pressed a little on the gas pedal and smiled.

~Julia